Help us answer questions!

We are writing answers to many of the questions we are frequently asked as we begin this new stage of ministry.

But we need your help! Which questions should we focus on? We’ve written below a hitlist of questions we are working through. Please vote for the three you would like us to focus on first. (It’s all completely anonymous!)

Do you have any other questions you would like us to answer? Please write it in a comment below.

How to make the perfect Greek salad

The Guardian has an article today on how to make the perfect Greek salad. Go read it, then eat some lovely Greek salad outside in the sunshine.

Please don’t forget the oregano, olive oil and vinegar – it’s not Greek without generous amounts of these three over the top. Kalamata olives are essential. They’re the king of olives. Lemon juice is also non-negotiable, and gives it all a nice zing. Forget salad leaves, which are not very Greek. And I’m not quite sure what to make of pouring ouzo on it… Let us know how that one goes!

So, go, give it a try! And whilst you’re thanking God for the food he’s given you, why not pray for your Greek brothers and sisters in Christ to be salt and light in a society that is hostile and hardened to the gospel.

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2014/jul/03/how-to-make-perfect-greek-salad

Fundraising update

Our ministry and training is financially supported by churches and individuals around the world. Currently, we have raised 95% of our fundraising target for the academic year 2013-2014.

Please would you join us in praying for provision of the final 5%, and would you consider contributing towards it?

If you would like to partner with us and contribute financially towards the remaining 5%, either get in touch or visit our Stewardship page, where you can give tax effectively.  We are happy to provide more information if it would be helpful.

A useful resource on the Greek evangelical scene

In the course of researching and writing my dissertation, I’ve struggled to track down much published information – in English – on  Greek evangelicalism.

I’ve just found – for the first time – an interesting and enlightening chapter that helps clarify the history and treatment of Greek evangelicals.

It’s accessible stuff – not too academic – and gives a helpful overview of the history of the Greek Evangelical church, the treatment Greek evangelicals face, and some of the constitutional restrictions Greek evangelicals face, i.e. that they can’t proselytise.

It’s on Google Books, which means you can read it online for free. It’s well worth a quick five minute read to inform your prayers.
Ioatrides, John O. “Evangelicals.” Pages 46–63 in Minorities in Greece. Edited by Richard Clogg. London: C Hurst & Co, 2002.

What is Reformation Day all about?

What is Reformation Day all about?

Just found a helpful and interesting article on what Reformation Day commemorates. It’s well worth a read if you’re curious or think I’m a bit weird for posting that slightly horrendous Bangles cover!

[Today], much of the culture will be focused on candy and things that go bump in the night. Protestants, however, have something far more significant to celebrate on October 31. [Today] is Reformation day, which commemorates what was perhaps the greatest move of God’s Spirit since the days of the Apostles. But what is the significance of Reformation Day, and how should we consider the events it commemorates?

Happy Reformation Day!

Besides being Halloween, did you know that on this exact day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed 95 theses (objections to the practises and beliefs of the dominant, Europe-wide Catholic church) onto the church door (effectively the noticeboard) in Wittenberg?

Martin Luther didn’t start the Reformation, but his actions turbocharged it. People like Wycliffe and Hus had been laying the ground work years before…

Eventually, the Reformation led to the rediscovery and development of wonderful truths that we all take for granted in our churches: amongst others, that people only need to trust in Jesus in order to be forgiven by God, that the Bible can be understood by normal people in church and not just the super-educated, and that you can have assurance about your salvation.

Happy Reformation Day! Hope you enjoy the video!

Happy Reformation Day!